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10 Signs You’re Ready for a Full-Time Freelance Career

So you tried freelancing, and you liked it.

You’re glad you have this source of additional income. You love the fact that the more you work, the more money you get.

You always read those awesome blog posts from travelers who fund their trips from freelance work, but you’re not sure you’re up for that. You also appreciate the experiences from full-time freelancers who don’t travel that much but can organize their day however they want to.

 

You want to try freelancing as a full-time career, but you have your doubts. Will you get enough work to cover the bills? Will you miss your traditional job? If you get too much free time on your hands, what will you do? What will everyone think of your decision to work from home?

Many questions on your mind, right?

Well, we’re here to answer the most important one: are you ready to start a full-time freelance career? If you recognize yourself in some of these 10 signs, then you’re ready!

1. You’ve Been Making a Decent Amount out of Freelancing for a While

If you’ve been doing part-time freelancing for at least six months, you know that the income is not always the same. If, however, you managed to make a decent amount of money every single month, then you should definitely consider freelancing as a full-time career.

This factor means that you have the skills that the clients in this industry want. If you start working more, you will start making more money.

2. You Realize that There’s No Such Thing as Job Security

Your parents kept telling you: you need a secure job. But you realize that the job market is no longer what it used to be, and you cannot and should not stay in a single organization forever. According to the data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average employee tenure in 2016 was 4.2 years.

Employees move, and that’s a sign of a dynamic career.

If you’re aware that job security is an overestimated concept, then you might as well try freelancing. If it doesn’t work, you can always search for a “real” job.

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3. You’re in the Growth Mindset

This is how someone with a fixed mindset would think: “Full-time freelancing is not for me. I don’t have what it takes to compete, and I don’t think I’ll be good at it.”

This is how a person with a growth mindset would think: “I might as well try it! If I don’t have what it takes, I’ll try harder. I’ll do what it takes to develop new skills and make it.”

If you recognize yourself somewhere in the growth mindset, you’ll be on your way to developing a successful full-time freelancer career, no matter what obstacles you encounter.

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4. You’re Great With Time Management

Do you know what the biggest problem of freelancers is? Time management. Many try and abandon this career path because it’s hard for them to control the procrastination habit.

If you’re great at managing your own time and you can really stick to a schedule, then you’ll definitely work it out.

5. You Can Sell Yourself

Creative workers don’t like the idea of selling themselves to clients, but it’s a skill they have to develop at one point or another.

Are you good at writing cover letters and communicating with potential clients? Are you comfortable telling what you’re great at and what makes you better than the competition? If that’s the case, you’re good to go!

6. You Have a Consistent Workflow from Regular Clients

Many people don’t like the idea of full-time freelancing because it imposes insecurity. What if you don’t find another great client when you finish this project?

But if you already have one or more regular clients who keep coming back for your services, then why not start working for them full-time? Whether it’s a client who’s been ordering graphic design projects throughout the past three months or an assignment writing company that provides consistent workflow, that fact changes everything. The client can start providing more work if you’re ready for it.

7. You’re OK with Spending a Lot of Time Alone

If you love a hectic office and you couldn’t imagine yourself spending entire days by yourself, then freelance work may not be for you.

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If, however, you achieve better performance when you’re left alone and you don’t want a superior to control your work on a daily basis, then you should definitely consider freelancing as an exclusive career choice.

8. You’re Good with Deadlines

Since you probably tried part-time freelancing before considering going full time, you already have the answer to this question: are you good with deadlines? Can you stay away from distractions and focus on the work? Can you handle the pressure of a client waiting for the work to be done by a precise date and hour?

If you turn freelancing into a full-time career, you’ll have many more deadlines to meet. Keep that fact to mind!

9. You Have a Good Professional Network

Yes; you may count on an online platform where you’ll hunt for projects. But that might not be enough if you want to develop lasting connections with clients. If you have a strong network of connections that could easily turn into professional collaboration, then you’ll do great at freelancing!

Networking is essential for progress in any kind of career. Freelancing is no exception. The more you expand your network of potential clients, the more opportunities you get.

10. You’re Ready to Compete for Gigs

Yes; it’s important to make long-lasting business contacts when you start freelancing. However, this is a vibrant industry, and you have to be aware that nothing lasts forever. At one point or another, you’ll have to realize that work doesn’t just fall on your plate and you’ll have to compete for it.

That’s not necessarily “job insecurity.” Competition is the driving force of the freelancing industry, and you gotta be up to it if you want to succeed.

Your life as a freelancer can be really exciting if you’re prepared for it. So? Are you ready?


Mary Whitman is a writer and editor based in Adelaide, South Australia. In her spare time, she likes to talk about Art and Sustainable Development.

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